r/ProRevenge – Ex-Wife FRAMES Me for Theft Because I Won Custody of Our Child! [My Revenge]

r/ProRevenge – Ex-Wife FRAMES Me for Theft Because I Won Custody of Our Child! [My Revenge]
r/prorevenge OP’s Ex-wife is a real stand-up gal! In this episode you’ll hear how she treats OP when he finds out that she’s been sneaking around behind his …
More info @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtWW9i4nJAo
Automated post from Cornay’s Explorations – https://ift.tt/2Sjb51Y
June 30, 2020 at 01:07PM

Quadcopter With Stereo Vision

Flying a quadcopter or other drone can be pretty exciting, especially when using the video signal to do the flying. It’s almost like a real-life video game or flight simulator in a way, except the aircraft is physically real. To bring this experience even closer to the reality of flying, [Kevin] implemented stereo vision on his quadcopter which also adds an impressive amount of functionality to his drone.

While he doesn’t use this particular setup for drone racing or virtual reality, there are some other interesting things that [Kevin] is able to do with it. The cameras, both ESP32 camera modules, can make use of their combined stereo vision capability to determine distances to objects. By leveraging cloud computing services from Amazon to offload some of the processing demands, the quadcopter is able to recognize faces and keep the drone flying at a fixed distance from that face without needing power-hungry computing onboard.

There are a lot of other abilities that this drone unlocks by offloading its resource-hungry tasks to the cloud. It can be flown by using a smartphone or tablet, and has its own web client where its user can observe the facial recognition being performed. Presumably it wouldn’t be too difficult to use this drone for other tasks where having stereoscopic vision is a requirement.

Thanks to [Ilya Mikhelson], a professor at Northwestern University, for this tip about a student’s project.

source https://hackaday.com/2020/06/30/quadcopter-with-stereo-vision/

RISE

RISE
Provided to YouTube by IIP-DDS RISE · League of Legends · The Glitch Mob · Mako · The Word Alive RISE ℗ Riot Games Released on: 2018-09-28 Music Publisher: E…
More info @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NuB-1myGido
Automated post from Cornay’s Explorations – https://ift.tt/2Sjb51Y
June 30, 2020 at 10:07AM

Towards a 3D-Printed Neutrino Detector

Additive manufacturing techniques like fused deposition modeling, aka 3D printing, are often used for rapid prototyping. Another advantage is that it can create shapes that are too complex to be made with traditional manufacturing like CNC milling. Now, 3D printing has even found its way into particle physics as an international collaboration led by a group from CERN is developing a new plastic scintillator production technique that involves additive manufacturing.

A scintillator is a fluorescent material that can be used for particle detection through the flashes of light created by ionizing radiation. Plastic scintillators can be made by adding luminophores to a transparent polymer such as polystyrene and are usually produced by conventional techniques like injection molding.

Super Cube
Design of the ND280 scintillation detector. The scintillator cubes are read out by wavelength shifting fibers. One end of the fiber is viewed by a photosensor, another end is covered by a reflector.
Credit: S. Fedotov et al.

For a future upgrade, the ND280 detector of the T2K neutrino oscillation experiment will use about two million cubic-centimeter polystyrene-based scintillator cubes with a total mass of two tons. The assembly of such a detector would be an extremely cumbersome task that is usually achieved by exploiting the workforce of many graduate students. To ease the assembly, the goal is to 3D print a single “super-cube” that is composed of many individual cubes separated by an optical reflector.

As shown in the image above, the researchers have used an FDM printer to successfully produce scintillator cubes with a light yield comparable to commercial plastic scintillators. Next, the scintillator parameters need to be further optimized and the reflector material to optically isolate the individual modules has to be developed.

3D printed plastic scintillators are not completely new. Researchers from Korea have also produced plastic scintillators with a commercial DLP printer. We would like to see this technique developed further until everybody can print their own DIY scintillation detector at home.

source https://hackaday.com/2020/06/30/towards-a-3d-printed-neutrino-detector/

Warriors

Warriors
Provided to YouTube by IIP-DDS Warriors · League of Legends · 2WEI · Edda Hayes Warriors ℗ Riot Games Released on: 2020-01-10 Music Publisher: Imagine Dragon…
More info @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSF_hH6AauI
Automated post from Cornay’s Explorations – https://ift.tt/2Sjb51Y
June 30, 2020 at 09:07AM

BEST CUBE #144

BEST CUBE #144
BEST CUBE #144 End music (Музыка в конце): Tomsize x Crvck It – Big Boss (NextRO Remix)
More info @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuTfvqAF4r0
Automated post from Cornay’s Explorations – https://ift.tt/2Sjb51Y
June 30, 2020 at 07:07AM

Mini “Gaming PC” Nails the Look, Streams the Games

To have a proper gaming “rig”, you need more than a powerful GPU and heaps of RAM. You’ve also got to install a clear side-panel so lesser mortals can ogle your wiring, and plenty of multicolored LEDs to make sure it’s never actually dark when you’re up playing at 2 AM. Or at least, that’s what the Internet has led us to believe.

The latest project from [Michael Pick] certainly isn’t doing anything to dispel that stereotype. In fact, it’s absolutely reveling in it. The goal was to recreate the look of a high-end custom gaming PC on a much smaller scale, with a Raspberry Pi standing in for the “motherboard”. Assuming you’re OK with streaming them from a more powerful machine on the network, this diminutive system is even capable of playing modern titles.

Minirig DetailBut really, the case is the star of the show here. Starting with a 3D printed frame, [Michael] really went all in on the details. We especially liked the little touches such as the fiber optics used to bring the Pi’s status and power LEDs out to the top of the case, and the tiny and totally unnecessary power button. There’s even a fake graphics card inside, with its own functional fan.

Even if you’re not interested in constructing custom enclosures for your Raspberry Pi, there are plenty of tips and tricks in the video after the break that are more than worthy of filing away for future use. For example, [Michael] shows how he fixed the fairly significant warping on his 3D printed case with a liberal application of Bondo and a straight-edge to compare it to.

This isn’t the first time we’ve seen a Raspberry Pi masquerade as a high-end computer, but it’s surely the most effort we’ve ever seen put into the gag.

source https://hackaday.com/2020/06/29/mini-gaming-pc-nails-the-look-streams-the-games/

KARENS BEING KARENS V6

KARENS BEING KARENS V6
▶ Binge all of the memes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=UUv-6OlG8qGY-mKlE_IUkI3w ▶ Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/Memellion #Memellion #Dankness
More info @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4d3vOOy1_w
Automated post from Cornay’s Explorations – https://ift.tt/2Sjb51Y
June 30, 2020 at 07:07AM

Making a Mini HHO Generator

Making a Mini HHO Generator
This generator is built like professional generators used in jewelry or cars, with the difference that it is much smaller. https://ift.tt/38c02O5…
More info @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79OaDbTvgE8
Automated post from Cornay’s Explorations – https://ift.tt/2Sjb51Y
June 30, 2020 at 07:07AM

Mini “Gaming PC” Nails the Look, Streams the Games

To have a proper gaming “rig”, you need more than a powerful GPU and heaps of RAM. You’ve also got to install a clear side-panel so lesser mortals can ogle your wiring, and plenty of multicolored LEDs to make sure it’s never actually dark when you’re up playing at 2 AM. Or at least, that’s what the Internet has led us to believe.

The latest project from [Michael Pick] certainly isn’t doing anything to dispel that stereotype. In fact, it’s absolutely reveling in it. The goal was to recreate the look of a high-end custom gaming PC on a much smaller scale, with a Raspberry Pi standing in for the “motherboard”. Assuming you’re OK with streaming them from a more powerful machine on the network, this diminutive system is even capable of playing modern titles.

Minirig DetailBut really, the case is the star of the show here. Starting with a 3D printed frame, [Michael] really went all in on the details. We especially liked the little touches such as the fiber optics used to bring the Pi’s status and power LEDs out to the top of the case, and the tiny and totally unnecessary power button. There’s even a fake graphics card inside, with its own functional fan.

Even if you’re not interested in constructing custom enclosures for your Raspberry Pi, there are plenty of tips and tricks in the video after the break that are more than worthy of filing away for future use. For example, [Michael] shows how he fixed the fairly significant warping on his 3D printed case with a liberal application of Bondo and a straight-edge to compare it to.

This isn’t the first time we’ve seen a Raspberry Pi masquerade as a high-end computer, but it’s surely the most effort we’ve ever seen put into the gag.

source https://hackaday.com/2020/06/29/mini-gaming-pc-nails-the-look-streams-the-games/

Mind your words when talking to (ex) employees. You will regret it fast

Mind your words when talking to (ex) employees. You will regret it fast
Please subscribe for new videos! And thanks for watching it! What is your favorite sub? Let me know! And if you have new stories that you want to be narrated…
More info @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7gZElPP1zk
Automated post from Cornay’s Explorations – https://ift.tt/2Sjb51Y
June 30, 2020 at 07:07AM

Mini “Gaming PC” Nails the Look, Streams the Games

To have a proper gaming “rig”, you need more than a powerful GPU and heaps of RAM. You’ve also got to install a clear side-panel so lesser mortals can ogle your wiring, and plenty of multicolored LEDs to make sure it’s never actually dark when you’re up playing at 2 AM. Or at least, that’s what the Internet has led us to believe.

The latest project from [Michael Pick] certainly isn’t doing anything to dispel that stereotype. In fact, it’s absolutely reveling in it. The goal was to recreate the look of a high-end custom gaming PC on a much smaller scale, with a Raspberry Pi standing in for the “motherboard”. Assuming you’re OK with streaming them from a more powerful machine on the network, this diminutive system is even capable of playing modern titles.

Minirig DetailBut really, the case is the star of the show here. Starting with a 3D printed frame, [Michael] really went all in on the details. We especially liked the little touches such as the fiber optics used to bring the Pi’s status and power LEDs out to the top of the case, and the tiny and totally unnecessary power button. There’s even a fake graphics card inside, with its own functional fan.

Even if you’re not interested in constructing custom enclosures for your Raspberry Pi, there are plenty of tips and tricks in the video after the break that are more than worthy of filing away for future use. For example, [Michael] shows how he fixed the fairly significant warping on his 3D printed case with a liberal application of Bondo and a straight-edge to compare it to.

This isn’t the first time we’ve seen a Raspberry Pi masquerade as a high-end computer, but it’s surely the most effort we’ve ever seen put into the gag.

source https://hackaday.com/2020/06/29/mini-gaming-pc-nails-the-look-streams-the-games/

Implementing the Exponential Function

Ask ordinary software developers how to code an exponential function (that is, ex) and most will tell you to simply write an expression in their favorite high level language. But a significant slice of Hackaday readers will program tiny machines down to the bare metal or need more speed or precision than available with a customary implementation. [Pseduorandom] knows quite a few ways to do the calculation, and while it isn’t light reading for the math-phobic, it is an interesting tour.

The paper covers a variety of ways to calculate the function ranging from various Taylor series approximations, Lagrange interpolation, and Chebyshev interpolation. The paper is someone abstract, but there are Python and C++ examples to help make it concrete.

The paper does cover a bit about why you might want to compute ex, but, honestly, we still love the Better Explained post about how it relates to any continually growing process. If you missed it, you can see the related video, below. We sure wish our math teachers had explained this to us.

We have to admit, if we had ever learned about some of these methods, we’ve forgotten them. But it is easier to get interested in this math when you aren’t having to cram it in right before a final exam.

We admit we are usually more interested in bit tweaking math these days. But we do occasionally open a program like Mathics.

source https://hackaday.com/2020/06/29/implementing-the-exponential-function/