BEST COUB OF THE YEAR 2019

BEST COUB OF THE YEAR 2019
BEST CUBE COMPILATION BEST COUB COMPILATION Gifs With Sound Compilation LIKE , SHARE & SUBSCRIBE #bestcube #coub #gifswithsound 💗 Likecoin – криптовалюта за …
More info @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDgN7z3Q_jY
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June 30, 2020 at 07:07PM

Experimenting with Vibratory Wind Generators

We’ve all got a pretty good mental image of the traditional wind-powered generator: essentially a big propeller on a stick. Some might also be familiar with vertical wind turbines, which can operate no matter which way the wind is blowing. In either case, they use some form of rotating structure to harness the wind’s energy.

But as demonstrated by [Robert Murray-Smith], it’s possible to generate electrical power from wind without any moving parts. With simple components, he shows how you can build a device capable of harnessing the wind with nothing more than vibrations. Alright, so we suppose that means the parts are technically moving, but you get the idea.

Vibewind DetailIn the video after the break, [Robert] shows two different devices that operate under the same basic principle. For the first, he cuts the cone out of a standard speaker and glues a flat stick to the voice coil. As the stick moves back and forth in the wind, the coil inside of the magnet’s field and produces a measurable voltage. This proves the idea has merit and can be thrown together easily, but isn’t terribly elegant.

For the revised version, he glues a coil to a small piece of neoprene rubber, which in turn is glued to a slat taken from a Venetian blind. On the opposite side of the coil, he glues a magnet. When the blind slat starts vibrating in the wind, the oscillation of the magnet relative to the coil is enough to produce a current. It’s tiny, of course. But if you had hundreds or even thousands of these electric “blades of grass”, you could potentially build up quite a bit of energy.

If this all sounds a bit too theoretical for your tastes, you can always 3D print yourself a more traditional wind turbine. We’ve even seen them in vertical form, if you want to get fancy.

[Thanks to Itay for the tip.]

source https://hackaday.com/2020/06/30/experimenting-with-vibratory-wind-generators/

The Challenges Of Monitoring Water Streams And Surviving Mother Nature

Small waterways give life in the form of drinking and irrigation water, but can also be very destructive when flooding occurs. In the US, monitoring of these waterways is done by mainly by the USGS, with accurate but expensive monitoring stations. This means that there is a limit to how many monitoring stations can be deployed. In an effort to come up with a more cost-efficient monitoring solution, [Rohan Menon] and [Ian Vernooy] created Aquametric, a simple water level, temperature and conductivity measuring station.

The device is built around a Particle Electron that features a STM32 microcontroller and a 3G modem. An automotive ultrasonic sensors measures water level, a thermistor measures temperature and a pair of parallel aluminum plates are used to measure conductivity. All the data from the prototype is output to a live dashboard. The biggest challenges for the system came with field deployment.

The great outdoors can be rather merciless with our ideas and electronic devices. [Rohan] and [Ian] did some tests with LoRa, but quickly found that the terrain severely limited the effective range. Power was another challenge, first testing with a solar panel and lithium battery. This proved unreliable especially at temperatures near freezing, so they decided to use 18 AA batteries instead and optimized power usage.

The mounting system is still an ongoing challenge. A metal pole driven into the riverbed at a wider part ended up bent (probably from ice sheets) and covered in debris to the point that it affected water level readings. They then moved to a narrower and shallower section in the hopes of avoiding debris, but the rocky bottom prevented them from effectively driving in a pole. So the mounted the pole on a steel plate which was then packet with rock to keep it in place. This too failed when it tipped over from rising water levels, submerging the entire sensor unit. Surprisingly it survived with only a little moisture getting inside.

For the 2020 Hackaday Prize, Field Ready and Conservation X Labs have issued challenges that need require some careful consideration and testing to build things that can survive the real world. So go forth and hack!

source https://hackaday.com/2020/06/30/the-challenges-of-monitoring-water-streams-and-surviving-mother-nature/

Your Own Open Source ASIC: SkyWater-PDF Plans First 130 nm Wafer in 2020

You might have caught Maya Posch’s article about the first open-source ASIC tools from Google and SkyWater Technology. It envisions increased access to make custom chips — Application Specific Integrated Circuits — designed using open-source tools, and made real through existing chip fabrication facilities. My first thought? How much does it cost to tape out? That is, how do I take the design on my screen and get actual parts in my hands? I asked Google’s Tim Ansel to explain some more about the project’s goals and how I was going to get my parts.

The goals are pretty straightforward. Tim and his collaborators would like to see hardware open up in the same way software has. The model where teams of people build on each other’s work either in direct collaboration or indirectly has led to many very powerful pieces of software. Tim’s had some success getting people interested in FPGA development and helped produce open tools for doing so. Custom ASICs are the next logical step.

Who Needs Open Source ASICs?

Of course, FPGAs and ASICs aren’t the answer to every problem. We can’t help but notice that some examples you see — including ours — are sometimes better for learning than actually practical. For example, the classic sample for learning about state machines on an FPGA is a traffic light. Why not? Everyone sort of understands what it is supposed to do, it has clear state logic, and you can make it as simple as you like or quite complex if it senses vehicles and pedestrian crosswalk buttons or changes based on schedules.

However, if you were really building a traffic light, it wouldn’t make a lot of sense to do it in an FPGA. Even the simplest microcontroller would be up to the task and would be cheaper both to buy and in terms of engineering costs by a wide margin.

SemASICs occupy a similar niche, but with a little bit of a difference. On the plus side, they should be denser, faster, and less power hungry than a similar FPGA. That makes sense because the ASIC is sort of an FPGA where the interconnections are made with dedicated metal lines instead of being generally configurable. You can also put down exactly the circuits you want — or, at least, choose from a variety of cells instead of having to use whatever the FPGA’s architect decided you need. You can even include analog cells alongside digital circuitry.

On the negative side, ASICs are not for the sloppy. Historically, taping out an ASIC has been very expensive. So you have a run of parts but — oops — you forgot that counter needs to reset to a non-zero number. In an FPGA, that’s a minor annoyance; you simply change the configuration — especially now that one time programmable FPGAs are rare outside of certain applications. Even if you have to trash an FPGA and program another one, they are generally not very expensive unless they are radiation hardened or very large devices.

If you make that mistake on an ASIC, you are in big trouble. You can’t change anything on the parts you have. You have to have a new batch built with new upfront costs. In the commercial world, that kind of mistake can be career-ending.

Tim makes it clear that his target audience isn’t the professional building custom ASICs, though. It is us. The hackers and tinkerers that want to create custom ICs. There may be some student market, too, although schools often have deals to make that feasible already.

Tim does point out, though, that a lot of those school deals are bound up with nondisclosure agreements the students have to sign, so it’s possible that open tools will spur new published research which would be a good thing. Still, I get the sense they think most of the interest will be from our community.

Notable about this process is that the 130 nm process being used isn’t cutting edge technology. The Skywater Technologies fab was built by Cypress Semiconductor in 1991 in Bloomington, Minnesota. Tim says professional designers have moved so far from these large geometries that our designers may have to rediscover some lost knowledge along the way to get the most from an IC made on the larger processes now. But the existing infrastructure is a big part of what makes this project more affordable.

So How Do You Get Them?

Tim had a lot to say about cell libraries that are eminent and how each one was tuned for a different purpose (e.g., high density or low power or high speed). However, we wanted to know how we’d get actual parts. Apparently, some of the details or still being worked out.

Csp
Chip scale devices on a penny by Cp82 CC-BY-SA 3.0

In November, they plan to order a multiproject wafer with 40 slots. They don’t know yet if they will have to beg and plead to get 40 designs or if they will have to winnow the select down from all possible candidates. If you are one of the 40, you’ll get about 10mm square to play with and wind up with somewhere around 100 to 300 chips in chip-scale packaging (CSP). You can see a typical CSP sitting on a US penny in the accompanying photo.

There are a few stipulations. You’ll submit your design on GitHub (or some similar public repository), so your design is going to be open source. That means even if you aren’t one of the 40, you’ve just put your chip out for the world to see. The foundry will automatically check your design to meet certain technical criteria. At this early point there doesn’t seem to be a firm plan on how they will select designs for inclusion in the first run. Presumably, if there are a lot of entrants and things work well, there will be more wafers in 2021.

There are still a lot of unanswered questions. Can you pay to get your own tape out? If so, do you still have to be open source? What if you have some made and then want more? How much does that cost? This is very early and we do we not yet know the answers to these questions, but details will come together over time.

The Key

Like I said earlier, ASICs aren’t for everyone and they certainly aren’t for people who test and debug as they go. Verification is essential for a successful ASIC project. That means a lot of this will hinge on the simulation tools available and the quality of the models available. Spending a lot of time and money getting ICs that won’t work at the speeds you need, consume more power than you expected, or simply don’t work is heartbreaking.

Many times an FPGA can be used to validate some or all of your design before trying to go to an ASIC. When that works, it works well. However, because of the differences between the two technologies, it isn’t as simple as thinking of an ASIC as a fixed FPGA. You have the same problems you might have going from a hand-wired circuit to a PCB. Logically they are the same. But we all know you can have problems with that transition because of the different characteristics. It is the same problem here. How do you test your analog cells? Will the clock distribute the same? And ASICs have speed or power requirements which are difficult to mimic in a validation stage.

Tim Ansel gave an online talk today officially announcing the project. Take a look for more details on the process node itself and the tools used to design for it:

So will you try to design your own IC? I’ve been involved in ASIC development before, but I still might be interested in doing my own personal project just to be able to do all the steps. Let us know what IC you want to design — or see someone else design — in the comments.

Header image: Peellden/ CC BY-SA 3.0

source https://hackaday.com/2020/06/30/your-own-open-source-asic-skywater-pdf-plans-first-130-nm-wafer-in-2020/

HFM COUB BEST CUBE Best Coub Приколы 2020 Gifs With Sound Best Fails like a boss

HFM COUB BEST CUBE Best Coub Приколы 2020 Gifs With Sound Best Fails like a boss
Все видео из выпуска здесь All videos from the release here https://t.me/HFMCOUB https://ift.tt/2NJzx9a подкинуть монетку на жизнь / send m…
More info @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1D0UZ1XYPts
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June 30, 2020 at 07:07PM

Your Own Open Source ASIC: SkyWater-PDF Plans First 130 nm Wafer in 2020

You might have caught Maya Posch’s article about the first open-source ASIC tools from Google and SkyWater Technology. It envisions increased access to make custom chips — Application Specific Integrated Circuits — designed using open-source tools, and made real through existing chip fabrication facilities. My first thought? How much does it cost to tape out? That is, how do I take the design on my screen and get actual parts in my hands? I asked Google’s Tim Ansel to explain some more about the project’s goals and how I was going to get my parts.

The goals are pretty straightforward. Tim and his collaborators would like to see hardware open up in the same way software has. The model where teams of people build on each other’s work either in direct collaboration or indirectly has led to many very powerful pieces of software. Tim’s had some success getting people interested in FPGA development and helped produce open tools for doing so. Custom ASICs are the next logical step.

Who Needs Open Source ASICs?

Of course, FPGAs and ASICs aren’t the answer to every problem. We can’t help but notice that some examples you see — including ours — are sometimes better for learning than actually practical. For example, the classic sample for learning about state machines on an FPGA is a traffic light. Why not? Everyone sort of understands what it is supposed to do, it has clear state logic, and you can make it as simple as you like or quite complex if it senses vehicles and pedestrian crosswalk buttons or changes based on schedules.

However, if you were really building a traffic light, it wouldn’t make a lot of sense to do it in an FPGA. Even the simplest microcontroller would be up to the task and would be cheaper both to buy and in terms of engineering costs by a wide margin.

SemASICs occupy a similar niche, but with a little bit of a difference. On the plus side, they should be denser, faster, and less power hungry than a similar FPGA. That makes sense because the ASIC is sort of an FPGA where the interconnections are made with dedicated metal lines instead of being generally configurable. You can also put down exactly the circuits you want — or, at least, choose from a variety of cells instead of having to use whatever the FPGA’s architect decided you need. You can even include analog cells alongside digital circuitry.

On the negative side, ASICs are not for the sloppy. Historically, taping out an ASIC has been very expensive. So you have a run of parts but — oops — you forgot that counter needs to reset to a non-zero number. In an FPGA, that’s a minor annoyance; you simply change the configuration — especially now that one time programmable FPGAs are rare outside of certain applications. Even if you have to trash an FPGA and program another one, they are generally not very expensive unless they are radiation hardened or very large devices.

If you make that mistake on an ASIC, you are in big trouble. You can’t change anything on the parts you have. You have to have a new batch built with new upfront costs. In the commercial world, that kind of mistake can be career-ending.

Tim makes it clear that his target audience isn’t the professional building custom ASICs, though. It is us. The hackers and tinkerers that want to create custom ICs. There may be some student market, too, although schools often have deals to make that feasible already.

Tim does point out, though, that a lot of those school deals are bound up with nondisclosure agreements the students have to sign, so it’s possible that open tools will spur new published research which would be a good thing. Still, I get the sense they think most of the interest will be from our community.

Notable about this process is that the 130 nm process being used isn’t cutting edge technology. The Skywater Technologies fab was built by Cypress Semiconductor in 1991 in Bloomington, Minnesota. Tim says professional designers have moved so far from these large geometries that our designers may have to rediscover some lost knowledge along the way to get the most from an IC made on the larger processes now. But the existing infrastructure is a big part of what makes this project more affordable.

So How Do You Get Them?

Tim had a lot to say about cell libraries that are eminent and how each one was tuned for a different purpose (e.g., high density or low power or high speed). However, we wanted to know how we’d get actual parts. Apparently, some of the details or still being worked out.

Csp
Chip scale devices on a penny by Cp82 CC-BY-SA 3.0

In November, they plan to order a multiproject wafer with 40 slots. They don’t know yet if they will have to beg and plead to get 40 designs or if they will have to winnow the select down from all possible candidates. If you are one of the 40, you’ll get about 10mm square to play with and wind up with somewhere around 100 to 300 chips in chip-scale packaging (CSP). You can see a typical CSP sitting on a US penny in the accompanying photo.

There are a few stipulations. You’ll submit your design on GitHub (or some similar public repository), so your design is going to be open source. That means even if you aren’t one of the 40, you’ve just put your chip out for the world to see. The foundry will automatically check your design to meet certain technical criteria. At this early point there doesn’t seem to be a firm plan on how they will select designs for inclusion in the first run. Presumably, if there are a lot of entrants and things work well, there will be more wafers in 2021.

There are still a lot of unanswered questions. Can you pay to get your own tape out? If so, do you still have to be open source? What if you have some made and then want more? How much does that cost? This is very early and we do we not yet know the answers to these questions, but details will come together over time.

The Key

Like I said earlier, ASICs aren’t for everyone and they certainly aren’t for people who test and debug as they go. Verification is essential for a successful ASIC project. That means a lot of this will hinge on the simulation tools available and the quality of the models available. Spending a lot of time and money getting ICs that won’t work at the speeds you need, consume more power than you expected, or simply don’t work is heartbreaking.

Many times an FPGA can be used to validate some or all of your design before trying to go to an ASIC. When that works, it works well. However, because of the differences between the two technologies, it isn’t as simple as thinking of an ASIC as a fixed FPGA. You have the same problems you might have going from a hand-wired circuit to a PCB. Logically they are the same. But we all know you can have problems with that transition because of the different characteristics. It is the same problem here. How do you test your analog cells? Will the clock distribute the same? And ASICs have speed or power requirements which are difficult to mimic in a validation stage.

Tim Ansel gave an online talk today officially announcing the project. Take a look for more details on the process node itself and the tools used to design for it:

So will you try to design your own IC? I’ve been involved in ASIC development before, but I still might be interested in doing my own personal project just to be able to do all the steps. Let us know what IC you want to design — or see someone else design — in the comments.

Header image: Peellden/ CC BY-SA 3.0

source https://hackaday.com/2020/06/30/your-own-open-source-asic-skywater-pdf-plans-first-130-nm-wafer-in-2020/

Questions That Atheists Can’t Answer…Answered!

Questions That Atheists Can’t Answer…Answered!
*** Earn Free Cash Here: https://ift.tt/38dgei9 Thanks to Opinion Outpost for Sponsoring this video! *** Yes I am BACK!! And what better way to…
More info @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jdON84xwaRs
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June 30, 2020 at 06:07PM

Mormon Listener SCHOOLS ME

Mormon Listener SCHOOLS ME
In this video, I respond to a voicemail criticizing the way I address mormonism. Is it a cult? Is the CES letter legitimate? Game Shop: https://www.etsy.com/…
More info @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIUySTl_Nyw
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June 30, 2020 at 06:07PM

There Goes Another Bible Thumper – The Atheist Experience #547

There Goes Another Bible Thumper – The Atheist Experience #547
What if we got rid of religion…but kept the bible? I say we would only be halfway done. Matt hangs this bible thumping, non-christian out to dry. I said it…
More info @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_1Ikf-9EkA
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June 30, 2020 at 06:07PM

Your Own Open Source ASIC: SkyWater-PDF Plans First 130 nm Wafer in 2020

You might have caught Maya Posch’s article about the first open-source ASIC tools from Google and SkyWater Technology. It envisions increased access to make custom chips — Application Specific Integrated Circuits — designed using open-source tools, and made real through existing chip fabrication facilities. My first thought? How much does it cost to tape out? That is, how do I take the design on my screen and get actual parts in my hands? I asked Google’s Tim Ansel to explain some more about the project’s goals and how I was going to get my parts.

The goals are pretty straightforward. Tim and his collaborators would like to see hardware open up in the same way software has. The model where teams of people build on each other’s work either in direct collaboration or indirectly has led to many very powerful pieces of software. Tim’s had some success getting people interested in FPGA development and helped produce open tools for doing so. Custom ASICs are the next logical step.

Who Needs Open Source ASICs?

Of course, FPGAs and ASICs aren’t the answer to every problem. We can’t help but notice that some examples you see — including ours — are sometimes better for learning than actually practical. For example, the classic sample for learning about state machines on an FPGA is a traffic light. Why not? Everyone sort of understands what it is supposed to do, it has clear state logic, and you can make it as simple as you like or quite complex if it senses vehicles and pedestrian crosswalk buttons or changes based on schedules.

However, if you were really building a traffic light, it wouldn’t make a lot of sense to do it in an FPGA. Even the simplest microcontroller would be up to the task and would be cheaper both to buy and in terms of engineering costs by a wide margin.

SemASICs occupy a similar niche, but with a little bit of a difference. On the plus side, they should be denser, faster, and less power hungry than a similar FPGA. That makes sense because the ASIC is sort of an FPGA where the interconnections are made with dedicated metal lines instead of being generally configurable. You can also put down exactly the circuits you want — or, at least, choose from a variety of cells instead of having to use whatever the FPGA’s architect decided you need. You can even include analog cells alongside digital circuitry.

On the negative side, ASICs are not for the sloppy. Historically, taping out an ASIC has been very expensive. So you have a run of parts but — oops — you forgot that counter needs to reset to a non-zero number. In an FPGA, that’s a minor annoyance; you simply change the configuration — especially now that one time programmable FPGAs are rare outside of certain applications. Even if you have to trash an FPGA and program another one, they are generally not very expensive unless they are radiation hardened or very large devices.

If you make that mistake on an ASIC, you are in big trouble. You can’t change anything on the parts you have. You have to have a new batch built with new upfront costs. In the commercial world, that kind of mistake can be career-ending.

Tim makes it clear that his target audience isn’t the professional building custom ASICs, though. It is us. The hackers and tinkerers that want to create custom ICs. There may be some student market, too, although schools often have deals to make that feasible already.

Tim does point out, though, that a lot of those school deals are bound up with nondisclosure agreements the students have to sign, so it’s possible that open tools will spur new published research which would be a good thing. Still, I get the sense they think most of the interest will be from our community.

Notable about this process is that the 130 nm process being used isn’t cutting edge technology. The Skywater Technologies fab was built by Cypress Semiconductor in 1991 in Bloomington, Minnesota. Tim says professional designers have moved so far from these large geometries that our designers may have to rediscover some lost knowledge along the way to get the most from an IC made on the larger processes now. But the existing infrastructure is a big part of what makes this project more affordable.

So How Do You Get Them?

Tim had a lot to say about cell libraries that are eminent and how each one was tuned for a different purpose (e.g., high density or low power or high speed). However, we wanted to know how we’d get actual parts. Apparently, some of the details or still being worked out.

Csp
Chip scale devices on a penny by Cp82 CC-BY-SA 3.0

In November, they plan to order a multiproject wafer with 40 slots. They don’t know yet if they will have to beg and plead to get 40 designs or if they will have to winnow the select down from all possible candidates. If you are one of the 40, you’ll get about 10mm square to play with and wind up with somewhere around 100 to 300 chips in chip-scale packaging (CSP). You can see a typical CSP sitting on a US penny in the accompanying photo.

There are a few stipulations. You’ll submit your design on GitHub (or some similar public repository), so your design is going to be open source. That means even if you aren’t one of the 40, you’ve just put your chip out for the world to see. The foundry will automatically check your design to meet certain technical criteria. At this early point there doesn’t seem to be a firm plan on how they will select designs for inclusion in the first run. Presumably, if there are a lot of entrants and things work well, there will be more wafers in 2021.

There are still a lot of unanswered questions. Can you pay to get your own tape out? If so, do you still have to be open source? What if you have some made and then want more? How much does that cost? This is very early and we do we not yet know the answers to these questions, but details will come together over time.

The Key

Like I said earlier, ASICs aren’t for everyone and they certainly aren’t for people who test and debug as they go. Verification is essential for a successful ASIC project. That means a lot of this will hinge on the simulation tools available and the quality of the models available. Spending a lot of time and money getting ICs that won’t work at the speeds you need, consume more power than you expected, or simply don’t work is heartbreaking.

Many times an FPGA can be used to validate some or all of your design before trying to go to an ASIC. When that works, it works well. However, because of the differences between the two technologies, it isn’t as simple as thinking of an ASIC as a fixed FPGA. You have the same problems you might have going from a hand-wired circuit to a PCB. Logically they are the same. But we all know you can have problems with that transition because of the different characteristics. It is the same problem here. How do you test your analog cells? Will the clock distribute the same? And ASICs have speed or power requirements which are difficult to mimic in a validation stage.

Tim Ansel gave an online talk today officially announcing the project. Take a look for more details on the process node itself and the tools used to design for it:

So will you try to design your own IC? I’ve been involved in ASIC development before, but I still might be interested in doing my own personal project just to be able to do all the steps. Let us know what IC you want to design — or see someone else design — in the comments.

Header image: Peellden/ CC BY-SA 3.0

source https://hackaday.com/2020/06/30/your-own-open-source-asic-skywater-pdf-plans-first-130-nm-wafer-in-2020/

Ken Ham’s Super-heated Ice Age Doesn’t Hold Water!

Ice Ages, Climate Change, and the Flood
Today, Bodie Hodge and Ken Ham of AiG take us through a couple of creation museum exhibits, and explain why a global flood would cause an ice age, and why cl…
More info @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wja3VWFPnVI
Automated post from Cornay’s Explorations – https://ift.tt/2Sjb51Y
June 30, 2020 at 06:07PM

Feminists FURIOUS That Sonic Movie Did Well Proving Gamers Right And Birds Of Prey Flopped SPOILERS

Feminists FURIOUS That Sonic Movie Did Well Proving Gamers Right And Birds Of Prey Flopped SPOILERS
SPOILERS Adam and Tim review Sonic The Hedgehog and compare and contrast the movie with Birds of Prey to figure out why one succeeded and the other failed. S…
More info @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1esjgJihTO8
Automated post from Cornay’s Explorations – https://ift.tt/2Sjb51Y
June 30, 2020 at 06:07PM

Aggressive Indoor Flying Thanks To SteamVR

With lockdown regulations sweeping the globe, many have found themselves spending altogether too much time inside with not a lot to do. [Peter Hall] is one such individual, with a penchant for flying quadcopters. With the great outdoors all but denied, he instead endeavoured to find a way to make flying inside a more exciting experience. We’d say he’s succeeded.

The setup involves using a SteamVR virtual reality tracker to monitor the position of a quadcopter inside a room. This data is then passed back to the quadcopter at a high rate, giving the autopilot fast, accurate data upon which to execute manoeuvres. PyOpenVR is used to do the motion tracking, and in combination with MAVProxy, sends the information over MAVLink back to the copter’s ArduPilot.

While such a setup could be used to simply stop the copter crashing into things, [Peter] doesn’t like to do things by half measures. Instead, he took full advantage of the capabilities of the system, enabling the copter to fly aggressively in an incredibly small space.

It’s an impressive setup, and one that we’re sure could have further applications for those exploring the use of drones indoors. We’ve seen MAVLink used for nefarious purposes, too. Video after the break.

source https://hackaday.com/2020/06/30/aggressive-indoor-flying-thanks-to-steamvr/